Jump to content

Fight the World: The Beginning of MMA


Recommended Posts

*NOTE: This diary is set in the Fresh Start scenario. All fighter records are 0-0, there are more weight classes and some fighters have been moved around. This is an alternate universe in which MMA did not exist the same way it does now. Furthermore, no other companies outside of mine will exist during the first 2 years.*

 

The year is 2000. The turn of the milenium. We have a highly advanced society, in which broadband internet access is available on every home, plasma screens are affordable and gambling is legal in most parts of the world. Boxing and Football are the primary money makers in the gambling realm, but bare knuckle no-holds barred fights occur in the underground circuit on a daily basis. In backyards, in street alleys, in bars, in gyms, in super secret locations, usually fronted by money men, people in power who delight in the "human ****fighting" element of no holds barred combat. The sport, if we can call it that, is not illegal, but it is frowned upon by the media and the people in the goverment. No form of regulation exists, no form of control, no governing body, no rules. If two guys want to fight and people want to bet in that fight, the fight happens. End of story.

 

Unfortunately, people have died. Fighters who lose way too many times are sometimes killed by the same people that represent them, resenting them for costing them so much money. Yeah, they then label this guys as drug addicts, pushers, pick pockets or something else and then blame it on gang warfare or drug cartel wars.

 

Yet, with all those demons, undeground fighting thrives. It is exciting to watch a wrestler battle a karateka, a judoka grapple with a BJJ master, a kickboxer and a boxer fight for supremacy. Some of these fighters have even mixed styles, creating something they call MMA: Mixed Martial Arts. Yet, no rules and no governing body means that little can be done to make this sport legitimate. One man had a vision, one man had a dream.....

 

 

Lance Decker. Known as a car salesman, sports stadium owner, hotel empire multibiillionare, oil baron, transportation mogul and.....boxing promoter, this man has done everything one would dream to do. If there is money moving one way or the other, Decker's hands are likely touching some of those bills. That is how Fight the World came to be.

 

What is Fight the World? It has existed since the mid-90's, but no one outside of a select few knew of it. Nobody ever talks about Fight the World. That was the rule. If you had millions of dollars, liked fighting and liked to gamble an invitation would be sent to you. Usually by a guy in a black suit with black shades, a lot of attitude and few words to speak. If you accepted you would pay the entry fee of $100,000 and would be given a date, a time and a place for you to be. A limo would pick you up, drive you to the airport were you would board a private plane and you would go to a secret location, sometimes in the USA, sometimes overseas. The people invited knew the location, but of course, I cannot say that here.

 

A five star hotel stay with 24-hour Happy Hours, plenty of food and booze and of course, a cage. In that cage 2 men would fight until one was knocked out, he "tapped out" (a form of quitting), he verbally forfeit or in some cases, his bones were broken and he could not stand. It was brutal, it was complete madness.....but hundreds of thousands of dollars were bet every year. Fighters.....fighters came from everywhere. They where usually the best of the best, for the grand prize was always $1,000,000 for winning the tournament and an extra $250,000 for winning a fight. That means that if you won the whole thing you would end up with around $3,000,000 in cash, plus extra "bonuses" awarded for having the best knock out, submission or fight of the night. The tournament lasted three weeks, each fighter fought twice in the first week, once in the second and once in the third. Losers got $10,000 and a ticket home. The organizers? They made money from the bets and in some cases they made over a dozen million dollars. Pretty soon the tournaments went from once a year to twice, then three times, then four times a year.

 

Lance Decker was an avid fan of these tournaments. He invested money in Fight the World and by 1999 he was the "majority owner" if such a thing existed. He had other plans. He wanted the "sport" to be viewed worldwide, allowing every single person the chance to bet. He wanted to make it legit. He came up with the idea of weight classes, rounds and judges like in boxing.

 

 

Pretty soon Fight the World was set to launch worldwide on the Internet thanks to Decker Communications and their monopoly of the internet with their product DOLCW or "Decker's Online Communications Web", also known as The Internet. FTW would have their own internet channel for free, people just needed to create an account, add their credit card and start betting.

 

Fight the World Rules:

 

Tournament Bouts: 3 5 minute rounds

Final/Championship Bouts: 5 five minute rounds.

 

3 judges score the fight based on:

 

Aggresion

Pace

Cage Control

Ground Control

Effective Striking

Takedowns

 

The judges use a 10-point must system with the winner receiving 10 points and the loser 9 or less. In case of even rounds, both fighters get 1o points, although judges have been "advised" not to use 10-10 rounds.

 

Fighters will not wear shirts, head gear or anything on their feet except wraps. Pants or tights can not be longer than someone's knees. Small, open fingered gloves will be worn at all times. Protective cups and mouthpieces are required.

 

Fouls:

 

No eyepokes, low blows, biting, headbutting or small joint manipulation. No grabbing the fence to protect yourself from takedowns, regain balance or any other purpose. No using the fence as a weapon against an opponent. Obviously, no weapons are allowed.

 

However, knee strikes to downed opponents are legal, so are 12 to 6 elbows, soccer kicks and stomps to a downed opponent are LEGAL. Closing guard is legal. Referee's can separate or stand-up inactive fighters. No protective 10 counts when a fighter is knocked down.

 

Violations will be punished according to their severity. Severity of a violation is determined by a referee. Violations can lead to point deductions or even disqualification.

 

The referee can stop the fight to protect a fighter from further harm.

 

 

 

 

 

These where the rules introduced by Decker in an attempt to regulate the sport.

 

 

Stay tuned because Fight the World Season 1 is about to begin!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*Posted on the new FTW website, sent to the press and broadcasted on national TV was this announcement*

 

 

Fight the World Season 1 BEGINS! Sunday, February 13th, 2000 from Lance Decker's Upper Decker Stadium in Dallas, Texas! Buy your season tickets now!

 

 

Three weight classes! Three Tournaments! The winners will be crown the first ever Fight the World Champions!

 

Official Tournament Brackets:

 

Lightweight Tournament:

 

Sean Morrison (USA) vs Gilberto Sabbathini (Brazil)

 

Edson Edmilson (Brazil) vs Bruce Steven (Canada)

 

William Harrison (USA) vs Dan Halvorsen(USA)

 

Jack Humphreys (USA) vs Jungo Futugawa (Japan)

 

Cong Dung (Indonesia) vs Darren Southall (USA)

 

Jake Keane (England) vs Chojiro Goto (Japan)

 

Caca de Andrade (Brazil) vs Lars Bolin (Sweeden)

 

Billy Russell (Puerto Rico) vs Claudio Palacios (Peru)

 

*Reserve Bout: Winner replaces any injured fighter*

Brandon Sugar (USA) vs Leonardo Da Costa (Brazil)

 

 

Middleweight Tournament:

 

Anthony Ray Shenkman (USA) vs Vagner (Brazil)

 

Bill Brown (USA) vs Wasischi Kobayashi (Japan)

 

Bruno Epps (USA) vs Schuler Eisenberg (Israel)

 

Xie Ming (Japan) vs Travis Jones (Wales)

 

Ray Eaton (USA) vs Buddy Garner (USA)

 

Thiago Ceni (Brazil) vs Tomohiro Takeguchi (Japan)

 

Souleymane Ya Konan (Ivory Coast) vs Ashley Ballard (USA)

 

Sutton Ripley (Canada) vs Tetsuji Myojin (Japan)

 

*Reserve Bout: Replaces injured fighter*

Seth O'Breen (Ireland) vs Watson Viana (Brazil)

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament:

 

James Foster (USA) vs Maxime Girese (France)

 

Sherman Shields (Canada) vs Stejpan Andaric (Croatia)

 

Wilson Franklyn (USA) vs Nash Harbane (USA)

 

Hazzan Fezzik (Turkey) vs Arkan Gleiser (Brazil)

 

Hiro Arai (Japan) vs Aleksander Ivanov (Russia)

 

Chuck Dooley (Canada) vs Adrian Pascal (USA)

 

Ari Peltonen (Finland) vs Yoshikazu Inamoto (Japan)

 

Gunnar Nilsson (Sweden) vs Armen Sarkisian (Armenia)

 

*Reserve Bout: Replaces Injured Fighter*

Allen LeFleur (Canada) vs Carter Potter (New Zealand)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fight the World 1: The Beginning

 

 

The premiere episode of the first season of Fight the World is here! Here at FTW.com we have decided not only to reveal the first card that you can see here live at FTW.com, but also write a little preview for the bouts.

 

 

Main Event: Heavyweight Tournament Round 1:

James Foster (USA) vs Maxime Girese (France)

 

Foster is one of the favorites to win it all here at FTW.com and here's why: The 6' 2" former Division I Wrestling Champion and All-American at the University of Alabama has all the makings of the all-american hero. His father is a Vietnam War veteran and he wrestles since he was 5 years old, making him perhaps the best pure wrestler in the entire tournament. Like a football quaterback he has the ability to formulate excellent gameplans for his fights and he has the cardio of a triathlon runner. Although his striking is not top notch, it is acceptable and so are his submissions. The 6' 0" frenchman is no slouch either: He has a judo background and has excellent takedowns and balance, but his striking is even more suspect than Foster's and he doesnt look like a guy that can truly take a punch.

 

Our prediction is Foster by TKO in Round 2 and the Betting Lines are 4-1 Foster.

 

Co-Main Event: Lightweight Tournament Round I:

Sean Morrison (USA) vs Gilberto Sabbathini (Brazil)

 

This fight is going to be about takedowns and takedown defense. The 5' 8" Morrison, much like James Foster, is a wrestling All-American, from Oklahoma University. He is not at the same level of Foster, but he is really good. His takedowns, wrestling and takedown defense are superb and he has all the tools to dominate on the ground. The 5' 10" Brazillian is a Muay Thai Kickboxer whose striking is miles ahead better than Morrison, but he has pretty much no ground game, no ability to defend against takedowns and no clue of how to take a fight to the ground. If Morrison gets the takedown he wins, but Gilberto has enough power to pull an upset.

 

Betting Lines are 2-1 Morrison, our prediction is Morrison by Unanimous Decision.

 

 

Middleweight Tournament Round 1:

Anthony Ray Shenkman (USA) vs Vagner (Brazil)

 

Once again we have a clash of a wrestling great, Purdue University All-American Anthony Ray Shenkman battling a Brazilian Kickboxer in Vagner. Same rules apply here as in the Morrison-Sabbathini fight: both guys are pretty one dimensional, with Shenkman having better ground game and Vagner being the better striker. Same deal applies here, it is about takedown and takedown defense, but Vagner is an even better striker than Gilberto and he has a 2" reach advantage.

 

Betting lines are 2-1 Shenkman, but we go with Vagner by KO in Round 1.

 

Heavyweight Tournament Round I:

Sherman Shields (Canada) vs Stejpan Andaric (Croatia)

 

Andaric is a wrestler from Croatia who was part of their Olympic team and he also carries a 25-pound weight advantage. Shields competes in something called Pankration and is built like a truck. Who wins here? I am inclined to go with the wrestler, but since Shields is built like superman and competes in an unknown style for us, I go with the mystery man.

 

Betting lines are 1-1 even (pick'em fight) but we go with Shields by TKO in Round 3.

 

Middleweight Tournament Round 1:

Bill "The Marine" Brown (USA) vs Wasachi Kobayashi (Japan)

 

 

Kobayashi is a Japanese Kickboxer that won the elite Fatal Fury Kickboxing Tournament in the Middleweight Division 2 years ago. His striking, especially his kicks, are miles better than Brown. But the former US Marine, Brown was a Golden Gloves amateur boxing champion and he also has a black belt in Judo, plus he won the Army Combatives Championship in this weight class three of the last 5 years. We go with the army man and the odd makers too.

 

Odds are 4-1 Brown, we predict Brown by KO or Submission in Round 2.

 

Lightweight Tournament Round 1:

Bruce Steven (Canada) vs Edson Edmilson (Brazil)

 

Now this is going to be a grappling contest. Steven is a self-trained fighter in the arts of "Submission Fighting" while Edmilson knows some Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, the art that everyone is saying will dominate this competition. Submission Fighting? Self-Trained? I think we are going with the sure bet and so are the oddmakers.

 

Odds are 3-1 Edmilson, we predict Edmilson wins by Round 1 Submission.

 

Reserve Bout: Lightweight Tournament

Brandon Sugar (USA) vs Leonardo Da Costa (Brazil)

We have two guys who both know Brazillian Jiu Jitsu, so it is hard to predict who wins. We don't have much info on their previous fights....so.....flip a coin?

 

Odds: 1-1 Push. The coin lands on tails and we predict Da Costa will win by....something.

 

Reserve Bout: Heavyweight Tournament

Allen LeFleur (Canada) vs Carter Potter (New Zealand)

 

Another difficult prediction as these men are basically self-trained. LeFleur calls himself a "Hybrid Fighter" capable of striking, grappling and tapping people out. Potter calls his art "New Zealand Jiu Jitsu" and refused to tell us if this is the same thing or influenced by Brazillian Jiu Jitsu. Who do we believe? Oddsmakers favor LeFleur, we flip a coin.

 

Odds: 2-1 LeFleur, coin lands on tails so we go with Potter by....something else.

 

 

Reserve Bout: Middleweight Tournament

Watson Viana (Brazil) vs Seth O'Breen (Ireland)

 

Why are the reserve bouts so hard to predict? Viana is a former member of the Brazilian Amateur Boxing Team so we know he can strike pretty well, with punches at least. O'Breen's art is "Sli Beatha", but we don't have a dictionary handy. Whatever that is, he says he can tap people out. This was enough to get him 2-1 odds. Ok, we go with him, no more coins!

 

Odds: 2-1 O'Breen, we go with him too. By submission. In round 1...or 2....or maybe 3. But he wins!

 

 

 

*NOTE* the predictions where done like this on purpose. Back then people didnt know much about MMA.*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My name is Rico Altamirano. I was born in Spain and moved over to the USA when I was 13. I became a world champion kickboxer at age 22 and by the time I was 25 I had won one of the four annual "Fight the World" tournaments, back in the underground days. Fighting was my life.

 

But that life was taken away from me. By my early 30's I had taken way too much punishment and I could barely walk without feeling pain. I was given two options: stop fighting and live a few more decades or continue fighting and spend the rest of my days on a wheelchair or worse. I might have died before I was 40. I took option #1, but that doesnt mean I stopped loving the fights. The first few weeks after my retirement were horrible. I just spent time watching tapes of my fights over and over, trying to figure out were I went wrong, when the big hits came and maybe, just maybe, what I could do to get back in the game. At that rate I would have gone mad.

 

One man saved my life. Lance Decker. The texas billionare hired me to be his private scout. Decker bet millions on every tournament and he needed someone who knew the game to help him figure out were to put his money. Why rely on annonymus oddsmakers and unknown third parties when you have a retired fighter to give you an edge? I got paid handsomely for staying at home and watching tapes upon tapes from all the competing fighters. Sometimes they would be footage from secret underground fights, other times they would be amateur boxing tournaments or some young stud's final collegiate amateaur wrestling bout. I got to travel the country looking at people get beat up. It was fun, it paid well and better yet, I was a part of the game. I was not fighting, but I still had to predict what one or two guys would do. Come up with gameplans, expect the unexpected, analyze fighters.....it was great.

 

Lance Decker saved my life. Lance Decker came up with the crazy idea of bringing Fight the World to the masses. Lance Decker made ME his match maker. I was supposed to hire guys, set up fights and oversee everything. Money was no issue. It was any fight fan's dream come true. Bringing fights to the masses. Going on an uphill struggle against the goverment agencies, parent groups and other people who frowned upon fighting. Although the fight would not be as difficult as it seemed.

 

Really, think about it! These people, these agencies banned ****fighting, dog fighting and other "animal cruelty" sports, yet they did not ban street fighting. Why? Because there is money to be made. Because the senators and lawmakers are some of the highest betters in the secret Fight the World tournaments. Better yet, if our plan suceeds and we make Fight the World as big and accepted as boxing and wrestling, these guys won't need to hide anymore. They can go to matches and satisfy their bloodlust without it being looked at as inmoral.

 

And so starts the first season of Fight the World.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fight the World 1: The Beginning

From the Upper Decker in Dallas, Texas

Broadcasted on FTW.com

Announced by Garth Ward and Ietsuna Isamatsu

 

 

Thousands of people tuned in to the internet, but our live audience consisted of 74 secret members of the previous FTW high rollers. We will keep live audiences limited and exclusive for now. Or so Decker said after we FAILED to sell a single season ticket. Oh well.

 

 

Reserve Bout: Middleweight Tournament

Seth O'Breen (Ireland) d. Watson Viana (Brazil) by Submission

 

This fight was all about perseverance. Viana out-struck O'Breen for two rounds, keeping the fight standing up and earning the judges favor on both rounds. O'Breen's face was bloody and puffy, but he was never taken down or on any serious danger. Round 3 was a whole different story. O'Breen came out and took down Viana after Viana failed to connect with a roundhouse punch. Viana was completely out of his element on the ground and scrambled like mad to get back to his feet, but O'Breen slipped out and took his back, sinking in a Rear-Naked Choke and putting him to sleep.

 

 

Reserve Bout: Heavyweight Tournament:

Carter Potter (New Zealand) d. Allen LeFleur (Canada) by Submission

 

 

"The Kiwi" completely dominated LeFleur since the bout started. LeFleur tried to stay away from Potter, preventing Potter from using the clinch or going for takedowns. Unfortunately, LeFleur ran out of room, got pressed against the cage and taken down. From there Potter gained side control and LeFleur was defenseless from the bottom. Potter grabs a wild punch attempt by LeFleur and turns it into an arm bar for the submission victory. LeFleur tapped frantically to save his arm.

 

 

Reserve Bout: Lightweight Tournament

Leonardo Da Costa (Brazil) d.Brandon Sugar (USA) by UD

 

The judges came into play in our third match of the night. The first two rounds were all Da Costa, who took Sugar down seemingly at will but failed to do anything from the ground, resorting to smothering Sugar on the ground. This gassed Da Costa and allowed Sugar to dominate the final round with effective striking, but Sugar could not finish the fight. Da Costa won via Unaninous Decision 29-28 (x3).

 

Middleweight Tournament Round 1:

Bill "The Marine" Brown (USA) d. Wasachi Kobayashi (Japan) by TKO

 

This one also ends in the first round. Kobayashi prevented a couple of takedowns and used his reach advantage to keep Brown at bay and prevent any grappling. However, Brown is a former golden gloves boxer and caught Kobayashi with a mean right hook to the jaw, putting him down. Brown pounced on Kobayashi and unleashed strikes from the full mount, dropping about 6 bombs before the ref stepped in to stop the match.

 

 

Lightweight Tournament Round 1:

Bruce Steven (Canada) d. Edson Edmilson (Brazil) by Submission

 

Steven earned the submission of the night bonus right here. Edmilson caught Steven with a big left hook early on and rocked him. Seeing his opponent hurt, Edmilson rushed at Steven but Steven was playing possum and tripped up Edmilson, sending him down face first and taking his back. Steven got the hooks in and locked the rear naked choke, but Edmilson managed to stand up and fall hard backwards, bouncing Steven's head off the canvas. Steven still held on and Edmilson was put to sleep in under two minutes!

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Round I:

Stejpan Andaric (Croatia) d. Sherman Shields (Canada) by KO

 

This was a bit slow and plodding. Andaric almost finishes the fight on the first round when he achieved full mount and started to drop bombs, but Shields held on for the final 12 seconds and was saved by the bell. Shields actually won round 2 using superior strength and wrestling to control and smother Andaric on the cage in a round that was loudly booed because of the long periods of clinch-fighting/man-hugging. However, Shields was clearly gassed as Round 3 began and 0:43 seconds in he dropped his hands for just a second....long enough for Andaric to connect with a massive uppercut and put Shields down and out cold! Andaric was celebrating before the bout had been stopped, he knew that punch was dynamite.

 

 

 

Middleweight Tournament Round 1:

Anthony Ray Shenkman (USA) d. Vagner (Brazil) by UD

 

 

The worst fight of the night, Shenkman basically took down Vagner on every single round and held on ground control, doing nothing of note, but Vagner did far less. Imagine one guy sitting on top of another for 3 rounds. That was that. ARS wins by UD 30-27(x3). BORING!

 

 

Co-Main Event: Lightweight Tournament Round I:

Sean Morrison (USA) d. Gilberto Sabbathini (Brazil) by TKO

 

Fastest fight ever! Sabbathini came out striking quickly, thinking to catch Morrison off guard, but Morrison got the double-leg takedown effortlessly, transitioned into a mount and dropped bombs until the ref stopped the bout at 0:34 of the FIRST ROUND! He didnt even sweat! Sabbathini's eye was swollen shut and I smell a broken eye socket.

 

 

Main Event: Heavyweight Tournament Round 1:

James Foster (USA) d. Maxime Girese (France) by TKO

 

Scary moment for Foster fans as Girese caught him with a head kick and put him down just 0:16 into the fight. Unable to do anything on the ground, Girese allowed the ref to call for a stand-up. Less than 30 seconds later Foster got the double-leg and controlled Girese on the ground. It all ended with a full mount and 11 unanswered bombs from Foster before the ref called an end to the bout by TKO. Foster did suffer a nasty cut over the left eye brow from that kick.

 

 

Quickie Results:

 

James Foster d. Maxime Girese by TKO

Sean Morrison d. Gilberto Sabbathini by TKO

Anthony Ray Shenkman d. Vagner by UD

Stejpan Andaric d. Sherman Shields by KO

Bruce Steven d. Edson Edmilson by Submission

Bill Brown d. Wasuchi Kobayashi by TKO

Leonardo Da Costa d. Brandon Sugar by UD

Carter Potter d. Allen LeFleur by Submission

Seth O'Breen d. Watson Viana by Submission

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*I have decided to make a little change to the previews in order to make them shorter*

 

 

Fight the World 2: The Serpent King

 

Live from the Upper Decker Stadium in Dallas, Texas. 9 Tournament Bouts! Make your bets now!

 

 

Main Event: Lightweight Tournament Bout

"The Serpent King" Cong Dun (Indonesia) vs Darren Southall (USA)

 

Keys to Victory:

 

Cong Dun (Pankrat Silat): Superior striking, particularly the kicks. Better strategist.

 

Southhall (Jiu Jitsu): Heart of the champion, he never quits. Hard chin, good cardio. Faster and younger.

 

 

Co-Main Event: Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Buddy Garner (USA) vs "The Enigma" Ray Eaton (USA)

 

 

 

Keys to victory:

 

Garner (BJJ): Takedown machine, great strategist, some of the best submissions in the entire world! Current member of the US Jiu Jitsu National Team.

 

Eaton (Wrestling): Better striking, particularly the boxing aspect. Master of ground control, even with inferior takedowns. Former University of Arizona All-American wrestler.

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Hiro Arai (Japan) vs Aleksander Ivanov (Russia)

 

 

 

Keys to Victory:

 

Arai (Kickboxing): More balanced striker, faster on his feet, granite chin. Creative striker, has the ability to catch opponents off guard.

 

Ivanov (Sambo): More power on his punches, better in the clinch, better on the ground.

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Jack Humphreys (USA) vs Jungo Futugawa (Japan)

 

Keys to Victory:

 

Humphreys (Wrestling): Former Florida State All-American Wrestler. Better takedowns, better overall striking, cardio machine. Excellent ground control.

 

Futugawa (Muay Thai): Brutal in the clinch, excellent knees, creative striking, 3" reach advantage. Former Fatal Fury Kickboxing Welterweight Champion.

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Hazzan Fezzik (Turkey) vs Arkan Gleiser (Brazil)

 

Keys to victory:

 

Fezzik (Sambo): The best fighter in the world today. Dominating takedowns, bone-breaking submissions, power puncher, master strategist, granite chin, dominant clinch game.

 

Gleiser (Karate): Better kicks. Creative striker. The prayers of many Brazilians who don't want him to get creamed.

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

William Harrison (USA) vs Dan Halvorsen (USA)

 

Keys to Victory:

 

Harrison (Army Combatives): Creative striker, Devastating ground strikes. Excellent cardio, heart of the champion.

 

Halvorsen (Wrestling): Dominant takedowns, excellent ground control. More well-rounded fighter than Harrison.

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Schuler Eisenberg (Israel) vs Bruno Epps (USA)

 

Keys to Victory:

 

Eisenberg (Stalk and Launch): Exciting fighter with one-punch KO power, superior cardio and striking.

 

Epps (Wrestling): Better takedowns, slightly better ground game.

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Xie Ming (China) vs Travis Jones (Wales)

 

Keys to Victory:

 

Ming (Muay Thai): Master of the clinch, deadly strikes, creative striker, better cardio.

 

Jones (Close-range Grappling): Better ground control, slightly better takedowns.

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Wilson Franklyn (USA) vs Nash Harbane (USA)

 

Keys to Victory:

 

Franklyn (Street Fighting): One-punch KO power, excellent striker, solid kicks, better cardio. Former Street Fighter World Warrior Tournament Champion.

 

Harbane (Bar Brawling): Good chin, solid strikes. Former Big Brew Bar Room King. Horrible cardio.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*Rico Altamirano Diary Excerpt*

 

 

There is an on-going debate as of who is the best pound for pound fighter in the whole tournament. I guess that it will be proven in the end. At least who is the best in their weight class and maybe by taking a closer look at their skills sets I can say who is the best overall. But boy, I am excited about FTW 2!

 

The two men who lead those discussions are Hazzan Fezzik and Cong Dun. I would love to one day pair those two up in a fight, but with all this push to make it "more like boxing" that may never happen. Fezzik has a solid 100 pounds weight advantage. I don't think Dun would agree to fight him and even if he did, I don't think Lance Decker would allow me to make that fight.

 

Still, it is an interesting mix of guys we have for the second show. I am excited to see Wilson Franklyn and it is no secret that I gave him the easiest opponent in the whole field, just to see if he destroys him and satiates some of that bloodlust from our spectators. Still, that bout is a "Dream Match" in many levels. Franklyn won the World Warrior tournament for street fighters a year ago and he is an internet legend, one of the few fighters who has some "cred" with the commoners because he has been shown fighting in a "Mainstream" site. Of course, videos where usually taken down a few days after they went up because of their "violent, inmoral content". Nash Harbane has a similar fame. He used to be a bouncer that kicked drunkards out, but he won the first (and thus far) only Big Brew Bar Room Brawl Tournament, a tournament that was aired on the internet by the Big Brew Beer Company. He is not particularly skilled, but he is one bad dude. He can survive a beating and win a fight. But can he survive a Wilson Franklyn-style savage beating? Oh boy, I can hardly wait.

 

On the technical side of things, I still don't understand why so many Division I-level wrestlers are leaving school early to try and compete in this type of fight game. I can understand the fact that they want to make some money, but we are barely paying them $2,000 per fight and only the tournament champions will make some significant cash: $50,000 grand prize, the title belt and all the other money they made during the initial bouts. Maybe it is the allure of competition, the desire to taste their own blood or being able to inflict a level of damage that they cannot do with the rules of their sport. Whatever the case is, I have been flooded by calls of other wrestlers that want in next time around.

 

That, to me, is the most significant sign that we are going to last. I turn down at least 20 guys a day and we are already planning future tournaments in three more weight classes. Plus we made an astronomical amount of money from bets the first time around.

 

I have a feeling FTW 2 will be much, much better. I can hardly wait!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fight the World 2: The Serpent King

 

From the Upper Decker in Dallas, Texas

Broadcasted on FTW.com

Announced by Garth Ward and Ietsuna Isamatsu

 

We made a decent jump from the 74 high rollers (all of which are back) and several of the cheap seats where sold as well, making for a total of 204 fans live.

 

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Wilson Franklyn (USA) d. Nash Harbane (USA) by TKO

 

I was surprised when Harbane came out and tried to do some clinching and dirty boxing. I did not know he could do that and I think Franklyn was caught of guard at first. But Franklyn shoved Harbane violently away and snapped a vicious right hand to the jaw, knocking Harbane down. Franklyn drops bombs from full mount and the ref jumps in and stops the fight. Crowd was very enthusiastic towards Franklyn and I hope he makes it far if only because his fights are sure going to draw attention.

 

 

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Xie Ming (China) d. Travis Jones (Wales) by UD

 

I have to give credit to Jones for a gutsy performance in this average bout. Ming threw everything at him, dismantling him with precision strikes, taking him to the ground and grinding him down, but Jones took everything and kept coming for more. The judges scored it 30-27(x3) for Ming, but Jones had a decent ovation from the crowd. I could see that under the puffy cheeks, broken nose and swollen shut left eye he was a proud man.

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Schuler Eisenberg (Israel) d. Bruno Epps (USA) by KO

 

It seems Eisenberg was in a rush because he wasted no time in putting Epps out. 0:39 seconds into the first round and after some tentative strikes from Epps, Eisenberg connected with consecutive jabs and a spectacular spinning back fist that put Epps down on the mat, out cold. The ref stopped the bout and Epps tried to get up and protest the decision, but his spaghetti legs gave up and he landed flat on his face. Yes, he was out.

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

William Harrison (USA) d.Dan Halvorsen (USA) by UD

 

Here is a very gutsy performance from Harrison, who was badly beaten in the first round after Halvorsen took him down and punish him on the mat. Harrison kept trying to defend himself and survived the round. However, Rounds 2 and 3 where all Harrison as he learned his lesson and used his movement and effective striking to prevent Halvorsen from getting close and executing another takedown. It was mostly a running clinic, with Harrison backpedalling and connecting with solid strikes whenever Halvorsen tried to make a move inside. Judges scored it 29-28(x3) for Harrison.

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Hazzan Fezzik (Turkey) d. Arkan Gleiser (Brazil) by TKO

 

This was an EPIC FAIL moment for the Karateka Gleiser. He got cute with a spinning kick, Fezzik grabbed the leg and used it to get a takedown. Full Mount+ Dropping Bombs= Gleiser is done at 1:01 of the very first round.

 

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Jack Humphreys (USA) d. Jungo Futugawa (Japan) by TKO

 

 

Another wrestler moves on with the "wrestling trademark" or as it is being called "Ground and Pound". Futugawa kept Jack at bay with strikes early on but as soon as Jack got that double leg he managed to put Jungo on his butt. A minute or so of struggle ended with Jack in full mount and bombs being dropped.

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Aleksander Ivanov (Russia) d. Hiro Arai (Japan) by Submission

 

"The Great Bear" had a bit of a struggle with Arai in the early going, mostly in the clinch where Arai's dirty boxing got him the upper hand. However, Ivanov tripped Arai into his guard and worked from there until he was able to lock in an armbar and Arai tapped with only 3 seconds left in the first round!

 

 

Co-Main Event: Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Buddy Garner (USA) d. "The Enigma" Ray Eaton (USA) by Submission

 

The first round was very boring as both men barely made contact and circled a lot. A takedown near the end of the round should have made Eaton the winner. Round 2 started just as Round 1 ended, with Eaton getting the takedown and starting to pound. For a second I thought Garner was done by this new "Ground and Pound" technique that has become so popular, but somehow he ended up countering Eaton into a Triangle Choke and Eaton tapped. Impressive come from behind victory for young Buddy Garner.

 

 

Main Event: Lightweight Tournament Bout

"The Serpent King" Cong Dun (Indonesia) d. Darren Southall (USA) by UD

 

 

Southall earned a fan in me after lasting 3 full rounds with the man many consider the best pound for pound fighter in all three tournaments. Jungo dominated with ease, scoring hits and takedowns at will but simingly unable to finish the fight. 30-27(x3) scores from the judges for Cong Dun.

 

 

 

 

Quickie Results:

 

Cong Dun d. Darren Southhall by UD

Buddy Garner d. Ray Eaton by Submission

Aleksander Ivanov d. Hiro Arai by Submission

Jack Humphreys d. Jungo Futugawa by TKO

Hazzan Fezzik d. Arkan Gleiser by TKO

William Harrison d. Dan Halvorsen by UD

Schuler Eisenberg d. Bruno Epps by KO

Xie Ming d. Travis Jones by UD

Wilson Franklyn d. Nash Harbane by TKO

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fight the World 3: Field of Dreams

 

 

The first round of the FTW Tournaments come to a close with 9 spectacular fights!

 

 

Main Event: Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Gunnar Nilsson (1-0, Sweeden) vs Armen Sarkisian (Armenia)

 

Nilsson, fresh of a UD victory over England's Kevin Portman is a promotional fight will take his superior striking into the cage against Sarkisian's talented grappling abilities. Who will emerge on top?

 

Co-Main Event: Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Chojiro Goto (Japan) vs Jake Keane (England)

 

Another exciting battle between Muay Thai Kickboxer Goto and Jing Quan Do specialist Jake Keane. Goto is the better striker, but Keane is the most well rounded fighter. Only one man will move to the next round.

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Ari Peltonen (Finland) vs Yoshikazu Innamoto (Japan)

 

Peltonen is a specialist in Sambo, the same art that already carried Turkey's Hazzan Fezzik to the next round. Innamoto is a Sumo wrestler and has a 45-pound weight advantage. It will be the strong striking and effective technique of Peltonen against the Granite Chin and "Inmovable Object" qualities of Innamoto.

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Ashley Ballard (USA) vs Souleymane Ya Konan (Ivory Coast)

 

If you want fireworks, this battle between two talented kickboxers should provide them! Who is the better striker? Who is the master strategist? Who has the intangibles? I know one thing: Ya Konan has a 3 1/2" reach advantage and that could prove to be the deciding factor.

 

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Caca De Andrade (Brazil) vs Lars Bohlin (Sweden)

Now this is going to be a real challenge! Andrade calls himself the only master of Brazilian Ninjitsu, while Bohlin brings a decorated career as an amateur wrestler that includes a Gold Medal at the 1996 Olympics in Chicago. Who do we take? The unorthodox style of Caca or the solid grappling of Bohlin? Can ground and pound win once again?

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Adrian Pascal (USA) vs Chuck Dooley (Canada)

 

The former 2-time All-American wrestler at Purdue Adrian Pascal has all the tools to dominate anyone in this competition. However, his opponent is the Canadian Dooley, winner of 5 consecutive Thoughman Contests and a man that carries a mean right hand. His one-punch KO power is gunning for Pascal's untested chin.....that is, if Pascal doesnt take him down first.

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Thiago Ceni (Brazil) vs Tomohiro Takeguchi (Japan)

 

This might be a battle of wills on the ground. Ceni's BJJ against the only Japaneese gold medal winner in Amateur Wrestling at the '96 Olympics. Takeguchi needs to back up his words because he claimed to be offended because he was not involved in the "Best Pound for Pound Fighter" discussions and I think he is coming out to make a statement.

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Tesuji Myojin (Japan) vs Sutton Ripley (Canada)

 

Ripley, like countryman Dooley, is a Thoughman Contest competitor with plenty of power. Myojin is another Sambo expert. Power punches will be the order of the day is this middleweight bout.

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Billy Russell (Puerto Rico) vs Claudio Palacios (Peru)

 

Now this is interesting: Two guys who are the only representatives of their respective countries in this tournament. Two guys who both claim to be experts in submission fighting. Only one will move to the next round. Which countries hopes will be dashed?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*Diary of Rico Altamirano*

 

 

 

It was Lance Decker's newest idea. To promote Fight The World 3 he would have Gunnar Nilsson take on English pro wrestler Kevin Portman, a guy with an amateur wrestling background that had left for the "show" of pro wrestling and who had not competed in a decade. It was supposed to be an easy fight.

 

 

Yeah right.

 

 

 

Nilsson used his superior striking to dominate rounds 1 and 3 and escape with the Unanimous Decision, but we had a big scare in round 2 when Portman took Nilsson down and suffocated him on the ground.

 

 

No more promotional stunts like that, Mr. Decker!

 

 

 

*NOTE: This was done to explain why Nilsson is 1-0....in reality he had in independent fight before signing with me and I did not notice until now ;) *

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fight the World 3: Field of Dreams

From the Upper Decker in Dallas, Texas

Broadcasted on FTW.com

Announced by Garth Ward and Ietsuna Isamatsu

 

Our live attendance dropped to 194 people. Maybe the violent nature of the sport is scaring some of them or maybe we drew better the second time out with Cong Dun on top of the cards and Wilson Franklyn showing up. Or maybe the "Kevin Portman" effect on Gunnar Nilsson showed that we suck. Either way, I have to invite Portman for the Season 2 Tournament.

 

 

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Claudio Palacios (Peru) d. Billy Russell (Puerto Rico) by UD

 

 

I was surprised to see that the two "experts" in Submission fighting spent 3 rounds standing up! First round was all Palacios as he used a surprisingly effective clinch game to pin Russell against the cage. Second round featured Russell using his reach advantage to dominate with strikes as Palacios could not adjust and continued trying to clinch. His face a mess, Palacios managed to win Round 3 due to Russell gassing out and Palacios went back to clinching/pushing him against the cage. Not the best opening contest as Palacios takes the UD 29-28 x3. I need to book better openers!

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Tesuji Myojin (Japan) d. Sutton Ripley (Canada) by Submission

 

This is the type of fight that proves that fighters need to work hard on their Cardio. Ripley dominated round 1 with effective striking and he almost finishes the fight when he sprawled a takedown and forced Myojin to turtle up and take shot after shot. Round 2 continued Ripley's dominance. He outstruck Myojin comfortably, rocked him a couple of times. However, the round ends with Myojin getting a takedown and settling into half-guard. Round 3 continues Ripley's dominant striking and he puts Myojin down with a big right hand! Ripley mounts Myojin and started to unload bombs, but somehow Myojin held on. Ripley gassed himself out during that assault and Myojin took advantage, easily locking an armbar and forcing Ripley to tap. It is a strange day when the guy with the busted up face is the winner, while Ripley barely had a scratch, but that's how it went down tonight.

 

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Tomohiro Takeguchi (Japan) d. Thiago Ceni (Brazil) by TKO

 

My prediction that Takeguchi wanted to make a statement was correct. The bout started and Takeguchi inmediatly went for the takedown, getting Ceni in his guard. Ceni, a BJJ practicioner, looked comfortable holding guard until Takeguchi started to maul him with 12 to 6 elbows! The direct impact of the tip of the elbow with the bones in Ceni's face quickly turned him into a bloody mess and the ref stopped the bout at 0:43 of the first round! Ceni needed 19 stitches to close all his cuts and his nose was broken.

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Chuck Dooley (Canada) d. Adrian Pascal (USA) by KO

 

 

The match played out just like I predicted. Pascal used his wrestling to take Dooley down, but the bigger man was able to survive Pascal's best shots and Pascal seemed quite unsure on how to finish the fight. Pascal took the first round 10-9. However, round 2 started with Pascal and Dooley trading bombs and Pascal took the worse of it. Dooley rocked him with an overhand right and Pascal tried to go for the takedown purely on instict. Yet, Dooley moved out of range and as Pascal struggled back to his feet Dooley caught him with a big uppercut right on the button. Pascal was down and out.

 

 

Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Lars Bohlin (Sweden) d. Caca De Andrade (Brazil) by UD

 

 

I don't know what Brazilian Ninjitsu is, but it didnt work. Bohlin puts on a wrestling clinic and took down Caca at will. Caca was lucky to escape a couple of submission attempts in Round 2. Bohlin even got the first German Suplex in FTW history in Round 3. The judges score it 30-27(x3) for Bohlin.

 

 

Middleweight Tournament Bout:

Ashley Ballard (USA) d. Souleymane Ya Konan (Ivory Coast) by TKO

 

This was the best fight in the history of FTW by far. 2.5 Rounds of two guys absolutely tearing each other apart with big blows. Ballard got rocked in Round 2 after a huge head kick from the African, but he somehow survived that round. With only 2:00 left in the fight Ballard managed to corner Souleymane against the cage and unloaded with power punches. Ya Konan was out on his feet and only the cage kept him up, so the ref jumped in and ended the bout. In the first show of true sportsmanship in FTW history, the two bloodied men embraced in the center of the cage and Ya Konan raised Ballard's hand. Ballard even gave Ya Konan the tooth Ya Konan knocked from his mouth. I hope the African dude knows little of black magic!

 

 

Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Ari Peltonen (Finland) d. Yoshikazu Innamoto (Japan) by Submission

 

Innamoto used his massive girth to clinch and suffocate Peltonen, easily taking the first round. Peltonen looked gassed after having to move Innamoto's size for so long. However, the second round began with Innamoto in reverse as Peltonen started to connect with solid blows. Innamoto got rocked and gave up his back. Peltonen jumped on Innamoto's back and locked in a standing rear-naked choke to put him to sleep. The ref waved the fight as Innamoto almost falls backwards and squashes Peltonen.

 

 

Co-Main Event: Lightweight Tournament Bout:

Jake Keane (England) d. Chojiro Goto (Japan) by Submission

 

 

Keane is one of our most popular fighters based on his UK TV action series Martial Cop. I thought his skills might be fake, but nope. He is the real deal and after a quick Round 1 submission of Goto (via Kimura) I hope he makes it far in this tournament.

 

Main Event: Heavyweight Tournament Bout:

Armen Sarkisian (Armenia) d. Gunnar Nilsson (1-0, Sweeden) by TKO

 

Well, Nilsson seemed tired after fighting Portman. It seems he was not fully recovered and now he is 1-1 after Sarkisian knocked him down with a punch combo and then jumped on top for the TKO victory in just 2 minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*Diary of Rico Altamirano*

 

And so it happened.

 

 

 

One day I woke up to the ringing of my phone. It was Lance Decker. I knew something big had happened because his tone was agitated. He was hyperventilating.It was a mixture of anger and excitement.

 

 

The good news? Our sport now had an official regulatory comission! The US Senate was quick to act after our first few shows and they had decided to create a separate comission from the boxing one that would fully attend to the health and well-being of fighters competing in what they had described as "Mixed Martial Arts" or MMA.

 

The bad news? Well, not only did the comission take a chunk of money from us per event, they had also established something called "Medical Suspensions" and "Adequate Rest" which basically restricted us from putting the same guys on fights in a weekly basis. That was going to be a problem.

 

FTW 4 will feature fewer bouts than the first 3 events and only two of them are tournament matches. Good thing we came up with a hook to keep people's attention spans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fight the World 4: Smash Mouth

http://www.FTW.com

 

Fight the World makes it New York debut at the Decker Square Garden with 2 Quater-Final matches and plenty of MMA action!

 

 

Fighters eliminated will start competing for a slot in the Season 2 Tournament! According to FTW CEO Rico Altamirano only 8 fighters will compete in the Season 2 Tournament. 3 slots are reserved for brand new fighters and 1 slot is reserved for the "Reserve Bout" winners if they are not needed as fill-ins for the Season 1 Tournament. Another slot is reserved for the losing Finalist of the Season 1 Tournament. That means that only 3 spots are up for grabs and the fighters with the best record or most impressive fights will be invited.

 

 

Main Event: Season 1 Heavyweight Tournament Quater-Final Bout:

James Foster (1-0, USA) vs Stepjan Andaric (1-0, Croatia)

 

Foster comes from a dominating performance agaist Maxime Girese, while Andaric comes from a Knock-Out of the Night performance against Sherman Shields. The winner of this bout moves on to the semis!

 

Co-Main Event: Season 1 Lightweight Tournament Quater-Final Bout:

Sean Morrison (1-0, USA) vs Bruce Steven (1-0, Canada)

 

Morrison made quick work of Gilberto Sabbatini by TKO in Round 1, while Steven had a submission of the night performance against Edson Edmilson. Winner goes to the semis!

 

NON-TOURNAMENT BOUTS:

 

Heavyweight Division:

Allen LeFleur (0-1, Canada) vs Arkan Gleiser (0-1, Brazil)

 

Middleweight Bout:

Bruno Epps (0-1, USA) vs Wasichi Kobayashi (0-1, Japan)

 

Lightweight Bout:

Brandon Sugar (0-1, USA) vs Edson Edmilson (0-1, Brazil)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fight the World 4: Smash Mouth

http://www.FTW.com

 

 

From the Decker Square Garden in New York, USA

 

Broadcasted on FTW.com

Announced by Garth Ward and Ietsuna Isamatsu

Attendance: 228

 

 

NON-TOURNAMENT BOUTS:

 

 

Lightweight Bout:

Brandon Sugar (0-1, USA) d. Edson Edmilson (0-1, Brazil) by SUBMISSION

 

Excellent opening bout with a quick finish. Edmilson came out striking and launched a good combination of punches. However, Sugar gets a stiff leg kick that almost buckles Edmilson. A double leg takedown follows and from there Sugar smoothly transitions until he locks in a Triangle Choke and Edmilson taps. Sugar takes one step towards a Season 2 Tournament berth.

 

 

Middleweight Bout:

Wasichi Kobayashi (0-1, Japan) d. Bruno Epps (0-1, USA) by TKO

 

 

Another bout with a quick finish. Epps got zero offense in the bout as Kobayashi came out a man possesed launching strikes in all directions and forcing Epps to run around the cage. A big right hand followed by a high kick to the face sent Epps down. He tried to scramble away but ended up giving his back. Kobayashi mounted him from behind and dropped punches to the back of the head until the ref stopped the bout. The total time of the fight was around 3:30.

 

 

Heavyweight Division:

Allen LeFleur (0-1, Canada) d. Arkan Gleiser (0-1, Brazil) by TKO

 

Both men came out strong out of the gate, getting good strikes and moments of control, making Round 1 difficult to score. Once again Gleiser tried a spinning kick and this time he connected, rocking LeFleur's ribs and giving him an opening to launch his assault. LeFleur resisted and managed to rock Gleiser with a big right hand, but the round ended just as LeFleur managed to get a Double Leg Takedown. Round 2 began just like Round 1, with plenty of effective strikes from both men, but once again LeFleur managed to get a double leg takedown and worked his way to the mount. With plenty of time on the clock LeFleur pounded on Gleiser with big punches until the ref stopped the bout. One of the best fights in the short history of FTW.

 

 

Co-Main Event: Season 1 Lightweight Tournament Quater-Final Bout:

Sean Morrison (1-0, USA) d. Bruce Steven (1-0, Canada) by TKO

 

Another fight ends in Round 1, but it had plenty of action. Steven out-wrestled the wrestler and took him down, but Morrison quickly grabbed an arm and tried an armbar. Steven fought out of it, but as they scrambled on the mat Morrison ended up on top. Steven managed to sweep Morrison and this led to another frantic scramble in which both men got back to their feet on a messy clinch. From the clinch Morrison got the trip takedown and quickly transitioned into a Crucifix position, peppering Steven with strikes until the ref stopped the bout. Steven was trapped and could not defend himself. Both men embraced post match and I bet Steven would like a second shot at Morrison.

 

 

Main Event: Season 1 Heavyweight Tournament Quater-Final Bout:

James Foster (1-0, USA) d. Stepjan Andaric (1-0, Croatia) by SUBMISSION

Another bout that only lasted one round. Another victory for Foster, but once again USA fans received a big scare when Andric put Foster down with a big right hand and assumed top position. Foster fought his way out forced a scramble in which he was able to secure a leg and trap Andric on a Heel Hook, forcing the larger man down and Andric tapped frantically to save his leg. Can Foster continue winning fights in which he is about to lose?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...